The Bishop

Flowers that are useful for mass planting.

Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ is a branching, tuberous tender perennial cultivar with dark eggplant-colored, almost black, foliage. This produces a stunning contrast with its scarlet flowers.

220px-DahliaLlandaff

large llandaff llandaff-early in year

The plant was named to honour Pritchard Hughes, Bishop of Llandaff, in 1924 and won the RHS Award of Garden Merit in 1928. The plant is about 1 m tall and flowers from June until September. As with all dahlias, frost blackens its foliage, and its tubers need to be overwintered in a dry, frost-free place.
A seed strain has been produced from this plant called ‘Bishops Children’, they retain the dark foliage color but produce a mix of flower colors and flower shapes from single to semi-double flowers in different sizes.
Plant Profile:- Height:1.1m (3&1/2ft) Spread: 45cm (18in) site: Full Sun Soil: Fertile, free-draining Hardiness: Half hardy
Also comes in rich reds & purples, yellows & oranges, as well as paler shades

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Propagation

How to propagate it

SPRING

Clumps of dahlia tubers can be divided in the spring before they are re-planted. Use a clean, sharp knife and slice the tubers into sections, making sure that each section has a healthy dormant bud (known as an ‘eye’) on it. Dust all the cut surfaces with a fungicide to help prevent infection. Plant the sections immediately.

LATE WINTER

To get even more new plants, you can take basal stem cuttings from dahlias in late winter. To do this you need to get the dahlia tubers growing earlier in the season, so plant them in potting compost, leaving the tops of the tubers exposed, and keep them moist in light shade at at least 12˚C. They should then start growing.

When the new shoots are around 10cm tall, use a clean, sharp knife and cut each stem out, taking a small chip of the tuber with it. Remove any leaves from the lower part of the stem and then pot it up in free draining compost (eg cutting compost) and keep it humid and at about 19˚C. Gradually reduce the humidity as the cuttings start to grow, pot them on, and harden them off before planting out after all chances of frost have passed.

SPRING

You can also take softwood cuttings from dahlias in the spring. Encourage early growth by potting the tuber over winter (keeping it moist but frost free) and then moving it into a warmer spot (minimum 10˚C) in early spring to stimulate early growth. Then take softwood cuttings as normal.

SEEDS–Bishops Children

Flowers are varied colours. Heirloom Flower - Dahlia 'Bishop's Children

Dahlia ‘Bishop’s Children (examples)

(Dahlia sp.)

A seed grown descendant of Bishop of Llandaff Dahlia. The plants have purple foliage and the flowers range from orange, red and pink.

A very showy plant. Ht: 3’ tall. (lift tubers in fall)–even when grown from seed.

  • Package Qty: 25 seeds
  • Price: $3.00

FROM AMAZON

Pollinated Flower Seeds, Bishop’s Children, 50 Seed Packet

by Seed Savers Exchange


List Price: $8.30
Price: $5.88 & FREE Shipping on orders over $25. Details
You Save: $2.42 (29%)
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Wednesday, Sept. 18?

Order within 15 hrs 17 mins and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Details

2 new from $3.79
  • Although dahlias were discovered in the 16th century by Spanish conquistadors, not until 1872 was a box of tubers sent to Europe
  • Bishop’s Children is a seed-grown descendant of Bishop of Llandaff dahlia, introduced in 1927
  • Striking mix of rich colors, impressive dark foliage
  • Half-hardy annual, 28-36-inch tall
  • Bishop?s Children is a seed-grown descendant of Bishop of Llandaff dahlia, introduced in 1927

******************

 

General source of cheap seeds: BY THE POUND.

http://www.flowersoul.com/flowerseeds.html

END

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