Farewell Concrete

Here are some great ideas for getting free of our reliance on concrete-an industrial process which creates a great deal of CO2 pollution. Fly ash from gassification is one of these ideas.

Would you live in a house made of sand and bacteria? It’s a surprisingly good idea

<strong>Had enough of concrete blocks?</strong> The hugely useful (but harmfully polluting) material responsible for the rise and rise of the modern city can no longer claim to be the only material available to architects.

Had enough of concrete blocks? The hugely useful (but harmfully polluting) material responsible for the rise and rise of the modern city can no longer claim to be the only material available to architects.

Edinburgh College of Art student Peter Trimble has created a possible solution using little more than sand and urea. <strong><a href='http://petertrimble.co.uk/microbial-manufacture' target='_blank'>Dupe</a></strong> is almost as structurally strong as concrete but produces no greenhouse gasses. Trimble's system is not yet ready for production, but similar concrete alternatives are already available to builders...

Edinburgh College of Art student Peter Trimble has created a possible solution using little more than sand and urea. Dupe is almost as structurally strong as concrete but produces no greenhouse gasses. Trimble’s system is not yet ready for production, but similar concrete alternatives are already available to builders…

Builders laying the concrete foundations of the Wilshire Grand Tower -- the skyscraper set to become Los Angeles' tallest building -- <a href='http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20140217005645/en/Headwaters-Fly-Ash-Record-Setting-Los-Angeles#.UyhZevl_uDl' target='_blank'>substituted a quarter of the cement </a>with
Fly Ash” The waste ash from coal combustion at power plants in Utah and Arizona increases the durability of concrete while offsetting the CO2 cost of cement production.

Builders laying the concrete foundations of the Wilshire Grand Tower — the skyscraper set to become Los Angeles’ tallest building — substituted a quarter of the cement with “Fly Ash” The waste ash from coal combustion at power plants in Utah and Arizona increases the durability of concrete while offsetting the CO2 cost of cement production.

Japanese firm TIS & Partners have created a new building material called “CO2 Structure,” dreamed-up in the aftermath of the March 2011 Japanese Tsunami as an emergency rebuilding material than can be put in place quicker than slow-drying concrete. By injecting carbon dioxide into a silica (sand and quartz), they managed to developed a carbon-negative building material with twice the tensile strength of brick.

Natural building materials are a popular choice for those looking to cut CO2 emissions. Making bricks from hemp results in a net decrease in carbon dioxide levels, as the growing plant takes in CO2. These bricks are made of hemp combined with clay, while <strong><a href='http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/10/hempcrete-hemp-house_n_1506662.html' target='_blank'>Hempcrete</a></strong> (a mixture of hemp and lime) is sold internationally as a thermal walling material.

Natural building materials are a popular choice for those looking to cut CO2 emissions. Making bricks from hemp results in a net decrease in carbon dioxide levels, as the growing plant takes in CO2. These bricks are made of hemp combined with clay, while Hempcrete (a mixture of hemp and lime) is sold internationally as a thermal walling material.

<strong><a href='http://www.ecovativedesign.com/' target='_blank'>Ecovative</a></strong><strong> </strong>already make packaging from agricultural waste and mushroom

Ecovative is already make packaging from agricultural waste and mushroom “mycelium” — and their next project is building materials. Founder Eben Bayer describes mycelium as “essentially the ‘roots’ of mushrooms” and says it is very good at binding together organic materials, which could one day make building blocks.

Another natural material with carbon negative production: lowly straw is making a return to construction. In America's
Straw bales are used as a both a structural and insulating material. Companies such as UK’s ModCell manufacture pre-fabricated wall and roof panels from straw.

Another natural material with carbon negative production: lowly straw is making a return to construction. In America’s “Nebraska Method” homes, straw bales are used as a both a structural and insulating material. Companies such as UK’s ModCell manufacture pre-fabricated wall and roof panels from straw.

Traditional building materials such as mud and <strong><a href='http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2513154/Farmer-builds-house-just-150-using-materials-skips--current-tenant-pays-rent-MILK.html' target='_blank'>cob</a></strong> -- a mixture of sand, clay, straw and earth -- have been proposed as a non-polluting alternative building material for small buildings, such as households. One <a href='http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/greenerliving/10478442/Michael-Bucks-cob-house-Does-the-answer-to-the-housing-crisis-lie-within-a-150-cottage.html' target='_blank'>man from Oxford</a>, UK claims to have built a Hobbit-like home from cob for less than $250.

Traditional building materials such as mud and cob — a mixture of sand, clay, straw and earth — have been proposed as a non-polluting alternative building material for small buildings, such as households. One man from Oxford, UK claims to have built a Hobbit-like home from cob for less than $250.

Recycled materials are making up an increasing part of building blocks. <strong><a href='http://www.aggregate.com/products-and-services/blocks/enviroblock/' target='_blank'>Enviroblocks</a></strong> are made from over 70% recycled aggregates, bound with cement, while <strong><a href='http://www.durisol.net/pdfs/Durisol%20Flyer.pdf' target='_blank'>Durisol</a></strong> units contain 80% recycled woodchip, which is wrapped around steel bars for strength.

Recycled materials are making up an increasing part of building blocks.Enviroblocks are made from over 70% recycled aggregates, bound with cement, while Durisol units contain 80% recycled woodchip, which is wrapped around steel bars for strength.

Clay blocks with

Clay blocks with “honeycomb” structured cross-sections — often known asZiegel Blocks — have been common in some parts of Europe for decades, but are now spreading far beyond. Manufacturing blocks from clay rather than concrete means less CO2 emissions from production, while the blocks insulating characteristics can cut a building’s energy costs.

Cutting concrete pollution could mean rethinking our approach to construction from start to finish. Housing made from recycled <strong><a href='http://www.gizmag.com/infiniski-shipping-container-architecture/22365/' target='_blank'>shipping containers</a></strong> has popped up all over the world and provides one low-cost, low-emission solution. Are there others?

Cutting concrete pollution could mean rethinking our approach to construction from start to finish. Housing made from recycled shipping containers has popped up all over the world and provides one low-cost, low-emission solution. Are there others?

— Peter Trimble found his formula through trial and error. A design student at the University of Edinburgh, he was aiming to produce an artistic exhibition for a module on sustainability, when he stumbled on “Dupe,” a living alternative to concrete.

A lab technician introduced Trimble to Sporosarcina pasteurii, a bacterium with binding qualities, sometimes used to solidify soil to hold road signs in place. The student tested it with one of the world’s most abundant resources – sand. Pumping bacterial solution into a sand-filled mould, he added nutrients, urea derived from urine as fertilizer and calcium. After a year, and hundreds of failed experiments, this process manufactured a stool around 70% the compression strength of concrete.

The process requires less than one-sixth of the energy used in concrete production, and is completely biodegradable. Crucially, Trimble believes his mechanism has the added benefit that it could be employed by anyone, anywhere.

“Once you have the basic framework it should be transferable. Imagine a Tsunami-hit farm in Indonesia that is not getting supplies. You could use sand and bacteria on site, practically free, and have shelter housing that is far more permanent.”

Trimble is working with NGOs to apply Dupe to Aboriginal settlements and insecure regions of Morocco. But while the applications are new and experimental, the concept of growing the material for our built environment is increasingly regarded as not merely interesting, but essential.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the construction industry accounts for 40% of the world’s C02 emissions, 40% of U.S. landfill and has been uniquely resistant to change. Concrete, bricks and cement have remained the dominant materials since the industrial revolution in the early 19th century, and as pressure mounts on resources and climate, scientists and architects are looking to the natural world for solutions.

Buildingbacteria

Bacteria have been at the center of alternative methods. North Carolina start-upBiomason is growing bricks on an industrial scale, cultivated from sand by microorganisms. The company has won major prizes and funding for the bricks, which will be used in a structure for the first time this year in a pedestrian walkway, ahead of building projects across the world.

Similar processes are being developed to build in the most challenging environments. British architects see an opportunity to cultivate new life in deserts, while NASA believe bacteria could allow the construction of bases on other planets without the headache of ferrying the material there.

While bacterial processes save heavily on carbon, there are concerns that by-products could be poisonous. But another living brick — made from mushrooms — has no such problems.

Functional fungus

New York firm Ecovative are producing materials that combine agricultural waste products such as corn stock with mushroom mycelium — the roots of the vegetable. Over five days the mycelium binds the waste to create a block with a stronger compressive strength than concrete, with none of the heat or energy required by regular bricks.

The product is in commercial use for packaging, producing thousands of units a month, and the company is expanding into construction. Ecovative believe that in addition to being renewable and decomposable, natural properties give them a performance advantage.

“It has great insulation properties”, says Sam Harrington, Ecovative Director of Sustainability. “A key benefit is flame resistance — without adding any chemicals we were able to achieve a Class A fire rating”.

There is scope for development. Mycelium effectively dies once its growth is complete, but Harrington is looking ahead to material that does not. “We are exploring ideas of living materials, perhaps that are self-healing or respond to leaks with indicators.”

Ecovative are in dialogue with major construction companies, and the material will soon be tested on a historic scale. A collaboration with architects The Living won the prestigious MOMA (Museum of Modern Art) PS-1 competition, and their creation will be installed in the museum courtyard this summer.

Growing for gold

“Hy-Fi” will be the largest ever grown structure, and first large building to claim zero carbon emissions. It will be formed of three 40-foot spiral towers constructed from the mushroom material, with varying properties of brick to maximise light and ventilation.

The material’s versatility offers unique design opportunities, says David Benjamin, lead architect of the project.

“You can dial in almost any performance you want. You can mix and match a variety of properties such as water resistance or UV resistance, lightness or durability. You can grow the bricks in almost any shape”

Benjamin says the bio-bricks could be made to last as long as traditional materials, but believes architecture must embrace temporary structures.

“It’s essential to recognize that not all materials should last for centuries. A lot of the steel in our buildings will last longer than we need. Our idea is a building that be made locally and quickly, and then have a plan for when the life of the building is over.”

Future applications would include pop-up stores, festival “tents” and emergency shelters, says Benjamin, but there are greater hopes for the material within the industry.

Stronger than concrete

“I could imagine every structure you would built out of bricks”, says Dirk Hebel, Assistant Professor of Architecture and Construction at the Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore. “No high-rises, but smaller scale structures and houses. The material is stronger than concrete, with better insulation capacities”.

The challenge will come in commercializing the products, Hebel feels. “There is huge demand for alternative materials. The question is how easy it is to penetrate the existing market. This needs time and a couple of buildings to show the possibilities”.

Stealing from nature

Another, more radical approach takes the material from nature but also allows it to build the structure. Michael Pawlyn, director of Exploration Architecture, is a leading figure in biomimicry, having previously applied natural processes to create man-made forests in England and the Sahara Desert. His latest project to grow a “small venue for spoken word performances” from undersea biorock was recently unveiled at the Architecture Foundation in London.

“In biology, complex structures achieve resource efficiency by putting things in exactly the right place, which is very difficult with made materials”, says Pawlyn. “Our ways should deliver significant resource savings.”

Drawing on the natural accumulation of coral reefs, his team would install a steel frame in the deep ocean and leave it to attract material. Growth would be focused on specific areas of need using an electrical current.

“We’re interested in looking at its structural growth patterns. We have stress gauges on the structure to measure force in particular areas. If one is highly stressed, we can input more current so the rate of deposition matches the force.”

Pawlyn believes the structure could be built within two years, for consideration at scale. As with Ecovative, a key challenge ahead is to integrate still-living material to allow intelligent biosensors that respond to the building occupants.

Innovators in this space acknowledge the ongoing barriers presented in an industry that has resisted modernization. But from rock to fungus, sand to space dust, the use of materials and processes designed by nature herself offer both a solution to the sustainability crisis, and a glimpse of our new built environment: clean, efficient, and alive.

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Doors Recycled–Reused–Rescued

 

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downtoearthstyle.blogspot.com
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Door / window repurpose in the garden

Repurposed Doors In The Garden

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houzz.com

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justimagine-ddoc.com

Old Paned Window planters

Old Paned Window planters

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heatherbullard.typepad.com

old wrought iron garden gate

old wrought iron garden gate

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realcutflowergarden.blogspot.com

decorated garden gate

decorated garden gate

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Old doors.

Old doors.

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images.search.yahoo.com

Image detail for -Primitive Country Decor Stands The Test Time Pictures

Image detail for -Primitive Country Decor Stands The Test Time Pictures

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cdn.indulgy.com

old window chair

old window chair

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bernideensteatimeblog.blogspot.com

weathered door

weathered door

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diekleineprinzessin.tumblr.com

use old doors to decorate!

use old doors to decorate!

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interiorstyledesign.tumblr.com

LOVE this Garden Gate~

LOVE this Garden Gate~

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apartmenttherapy.com

reuse a panel door

reuse a panel door

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flickr.com

Great idea!         love!
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canadiangardening.com

good reuse of doors

good reuse of doors

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forums2.gardenweb.com

Screen door trellis

Screen door trellis

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inspirationoooooahhhhh.tumblr.com

Old door turned into clock

Old door turned into clock

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huckleberrylanefurniture.blogspot.com

backyard swing <3

backyard swing ♥

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houzz.com

Recycled garden backdrop    Cool garden installation made from recycled windows, a door frame and wrought iron.

Recycled garden backdrop Cool garden installation made from recycled windows, a door frame and wrought iron.

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Our summer yard art project.  Repurposed old door and window frame with a pallet path :)

Our summer yard art project. Repurposed old door and window frame with a pallet path 🙂

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woodlandslifestylesandhomes.com

A mirror, shutters and a gate painted black — gives the illusion of a door that leads to another side beyond the fence.

A mirror, shutters and a gate painted black — gives the illusion of a door that leads to another side beyond the fence.

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Potting bench with old sink and door ---> Love the shelves...but maybe a cupboard?

Potting bench with old sink and door —> Love the shelves…but maybe a cupboard?

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hometalk.com

Old doors are easily found on garbage day. This old door must have been from the 70's.  Perfectly shabby making it ideal for a garden (plant) bench

Old doors are easily found on garbage day. This old door must have been from the 70’s. Perfectly shabby making it ideal for a garden (plant) bench

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A screen door project my husband made for my mom :)  Nice garden addition!!!

A screen door project my husband made for my mom 🙂 Nice garden addition!!!

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yearroundveggiegardener.blogspot.com

Niki Jabbour - The Year Round Veggie Gardener: I'm back.. with wonderful winter garden photos to share!

Niki Jabbour – The Year Round Veggie Gardener: I’m back.. with wonderful winter garden photos to share!

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teencraftconnection.com

DIY Vertical Kitchen garden & seed starting trays. Single repuposed bi-fold shuttered closet door and dollar store container trays. Materials used and the how Mom did it on Teen Craft Connection's page.

DIY Vertical Kitchen garden & seed starting trays. Single repuposed bi-fold shuttered closet door and dollar store container trays. Materials used and the how Mom did it on Teen Craft Connection’s page.

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Gorgeous & Colorful shed made of ten recycled doors, discovered in yes, you guessed it: Door County, WI

Gorgeous & Colorful shed made of ten recycled doors, discovered in yes, you guessed it: Door County, WI

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indulgy.com

repurposing old doors and windows | greenhouse made from old windows, love the tin siding (old tin ceiling ...

repurposing old doors and windows | greenhouse made from old windows, love the tin siding (old tin ceiling …

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blog.bernideens.com

There's so many ways to use old doors in the garen. This one is very romantic looking.

There’s so many ways to use old doors in the garen. This one is very romantic looking.

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junkmarketstyle.com

Dressing up the Yard, My attempt at re-purposing an old bi-fold door

Dressing up the Yard, My attempt at re-purposing an old bi-fold door

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Often we have problem on what to do with our defective doors, they would take a lot of our storage space! But if you are a crafty person, then you can upcycle them for a different purpose!

Often we have problem on what to do with our defective doors, they would take a lot of our storage space! But if you are a crafty person, then you can upcycle them for a different purpose!

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flickr.com

That door should be saved and not left to     rot.

That door should be saved and not left to rot.

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garden bench made from repurposed door...

garden bench made from repurposed door…

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fairenotions.blogspot.com

Repurposed Door garden shed.  But of course!  Why didn't I think of this?  Okay girls... looks like GG is a hunting at her ReStore.

Repurposed Door garden shed. But of course! Why didn’t I think of this? Okay girls… looks like GG is a hunting at her ReStore.

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flickr.com

reusing glass doors from a for funky decor in garden - maybe one day when we have a bigger place

reusing glass doors from a for funky decor in garden – maybe one day when we have a bigger place

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repinly.at-my-style.com

garden decor: Re-purposed old French doors used for pseudo-wall/screen in the patio setting...love!  Idea to note: would start trailing vines to drape over

garden decor: Re-purposed old French doors used for pseudo-wall/screen in the patio setting…love! Idea to note: would start trailing vines to drape over

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myrepurposedlife.net

Door turned into a shelf; could easily be made into bench with storage underneath.  Picture the window panes with b/w photos in each.  Sweet!

Door turned into a shelf; could easily be made into bench with storage underneath. Picture the window panes with b/w photos in each. Sweet!

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hometalk.com

Garden Salvage  I took an old door and coated the glass with mirror paint, then I mounted it on my fence. I added some porch poles and bunk bed slats as a frame around the door; decorating it with paint and flower pot finials. I added a decorative piece of steel as a topper and put some stepping stones in front of it. This is my

Garden Salvage I took an old door and coated the glass with mirror paint, then I mounted it on my fence. I added some porch poles and bunk bed slats as a frame around the door; decorating it with paint and flower pot finials. I added a decorative piece of steel as a topper and put some stepping stones in front of it. This is my “secret” door to nowhere.

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landliebe-cottage-garden.blogspot.com.au

Re-purposed shutters as a garden screen. This is a great idea.  We used our front door's -  Old wrought iron doors for the back yard.....the ivy has started climbing.

Re-purposed shutters as a garden screen. This is a great idea. We used our front door’s – Old wrought iron doors for the back yard…..the ivy has started climbing.

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dishfunctionaldesigns.blogspot.com

New Takes On Old Doors: Salvaged Doors Repurposed potting bench for gardeners DIY. I had one of these from the red barn in Modesto. had to sell it when we moved. I guess I will make my next one.

New Takes On Old Doors: Salvaged Doors Repurposed potting bench for gardeners DIY. I had one of these from the red barn in Modesto. had to sell it when we moved. I guess I will make my next one.

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No instructions, but it looks pretty self-explanatory.

No instructions, but it looks pretty self-explanatory.

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Red, antique door used as a garden gate.  What a great idea!  garden ideas.  vintage doors.  repurposed doors.  gardening.  garden gate.

Red, antique door used as a garden gate. What a great idea! garden ideas. vintage doors. repurposed doors. gardening. garden gate.

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Juan de Fuca Scale

FIRST DRAFT

This measuring system has a lot of unknowns, but it covers some of the main factors in evaluating a town’s process for dealing with waste. Nature has no waste and many ways of turning one entity’s waste into another’s food.

Willis-porkers

As a society, the industrial world has been characterized by an extraordinary human plunder of stored “assets” and a parallel destruction of the possiblity of growth or even survival for other forms of life.

Juan de Fuca, who is certainly not an invented character, was one of the first European visitor to the Salish Sea. He was Greek, however, from a displaced family of earlier upheavals and the Spanish never rewarded him for his explorations.

The goal of this scale is to show what an ideal, truly sustainable system for “waste” would accomplish. There are models all along the scale, but many systems (old, new and planned) fail utterly when using this scale.

1. CAPITAL COST:

Norm. $1,500 per capita. 10 points. Lose points down to $3,000 which is zero.

2. OPERATING COST.

Norm. 5% of capital costs per year.

5 points if less than 5% of capital costs.

Lose 1 point for each 1% increase above that.

3. WATER DISCHARGE QUALITY.

Norm: Better than average the population now drinks.

35 points for norm.

Some scale that takes it down down to zero for water than can only be used for irrigation.

Irrigation needs to be defined. Irrigation for human food crops? Or for pasture for cows that produce milk?

4. HEAT CAPTURE.

Norm: capture some percetage of potential available heat.

10 points for capture and reuse of at least 70% of potential available heat.

Zero if all heat wasted.

5. METHANE CAPTURE.

Same as above.

20 points for capture and reuse of at least 70% of potential available methane.

Zero if no methane captured. Although this may. Up to negative ten points if methane created and flared or allowed into atmopsphere.
6. BIOSOLIDS.

Norm: everything back into the natural world.

20 points for recyling of all biosolids in a fashion that does no damage to health or the environment.

Down to zero for landfill that generates leachate.

CRD Folly. Old School vs New School

The RITE Plan has articulated all the difficulties with the CRD’ “Old School” plan for improving Victoria’s sewage treatment.

Recently, after completing a study and prototype, Colwood has decided to go it alone and build its own New School plant: without the large federal and provincial subsidies the CRD centralized plant will require.

The Township of Esquimalt is demanding the depth of information that Oak Bay, Saanich, Victoria and the other members of the CRD seem content to exist without. Perhaps that is because they are being saddled (on McLoughlin Point) with the main primary treatment plant. The general public is using the Esquimalt Hearings to get the answers they can’t get from their own elected officials.

The Times Colonist is defending the Old School Project, (which is spending ten of thousands advertising in its pages), but the people are raising red flags and Esquimalt is holding the line. None of these citizens are opposed to treatment; they just want the best treatment that their $800,000,000  million can buy.

Art Bickerton makes all the key points.

I really cannot understand why the Capital Regional District directors are still supporting the Seaterra secondary sewage treatment plan when it is obvious that it is a costly mistake.

McLoughlin Point is too small and is in a dangerous tsunami zone. The Seaterra plan has an expanding billion-dollar price tag that will still be polluting the Juan de Fuca Strait upon completion.

Using proven new technology, the CRD can build a dozen modular tertiary treatment plants and place them near hospitals, colleges and other high-density buildings on higher ground before 2018.

In Victoria, a few tertiary plants could be hidden underground with affordable city parking above. The heat used in purification could supply warmth for temporary homeless shelters during the winter.

Bike and rapid transit lanes could follow the pipeline path as it weaves its way to connect with the West Shore.

If it really is costing a million dollars a month to delay, pay Seaterra a million to go away.

Use a plan that has a financial return and much of the costs can be reclaimed from the byproduct process.

The municipalities should own the computerized plants and staff them with trained personnel who can adapt, modify and rectify errors immediately.

Taxpayers are being forced to spend their money and senior governments are paying two-thirds of the bill.

It is the CRD’s responsibility to insist on a tertiary treatment plan that has the very best return. Art Bickerton .

Tony Rose deals with the redundancy of pumping sludge for 18 km.

It seems to me that once a decision is taken to incinerate the waste, this obviates any transfer to the Hartland landfill and makes the 18-kilometre pipeline redundant.

There are really only two choices these days for treatment: filtering, drying and incineration, or tertiary treatment with molecular filters.

The initial Capital Regional District option of spreading on the land is long recognized as unacceptable; the only choice they have at this stage is incineration.

The incinerator must be located as close as possible to the primary treatment, whether it is Esquimalt or not, to minimize cost and the risk associated with a pressurized pipe of biohazardous material.

Ideally, the whole treatment plant from raw sewage to treated water and compacted solids should be on one site. Colwood has taken the appropriate course, and this could well be followed by the various municipalities taking ownership of their waste and treating it in local modular plants within their own boundaries.

Environmental constraints will be the same for incineration regardless of the site; Hartland offers no advantages. What little ash is left over can be shipped to a secure landfill or completely destroyed. The pipeline is not needed.

Tony Rose Victoria –

David Stocks makes the case for redundancy across the board.

The article states: “The province might also require Colwood to retain a connection to the CRD sewer infrastructure as a redundancy in the event of an emergency.” Many Capital Regional District residents are concerned about the lack of redundancy in the Seaterra design.

The CRD has investigated redundant systems and concluded that redundancy would require “significantly higher capital and operating costs.” If redundancy would be a bad idea for Seaterra, why would it be a good idea for Colwood?

On the other hand, if redundancy would be required for Colwood, why should it not be required for Seaterra? Redundancy costs money, but it can save enormous amounts of money and environmental damage when the inevitable problems occur.

Just ask the people of Halifax about the extra costs when their monolithic sewage treatment plant was knocked out of commission.

If Halifax had built two plants that could back each other up, the city would have saved millions of dollars and months of pumping raw sewage into its harbour. The only way the CRD can claim that the Seaterra design is cheaper is by ignoring the financial and environmental costs of an emergency.

The CRD needs at least two treatment plants that are connected, so they can continue to operate when an emergency arises. David Stocks Colwood

And Dennis Robinson makes the case for a full plant Trial Island.

Re: “Colwood gets ‘go’ for own sewage plant,” March 13. With Colwood going alone with its own sewage treatment plant, isn’t it time to look at further options for the rest of us?

Trial Island is only 500 metres off the Oak Bay shoreline, and even though part of the island is an ecological reserve, there is still a large tract that could accommodate both a wastewater treatment plant as well as a resource-recovery centre.

With a Trial Island location, everything is together as it should be, with no need to run an 18.5-kilometre pipeline from McLoughlin Point to the Hartland landfill. And then there would be no need to run a 600-metre sewer line under the entrance to the harbour from Ogden Point to a proposed treatment plant at McLoughlin Point.

In some cases, the direction of sewage flow would be reversed, and it could be piped under the harbour at Bay Street until that bridge is upgraded or replaced. Then the pipeline could be suspended under the Bay Street Bridge, just as they are proposing to do at Tillicum over the Gorge, and send it on its way to Trial Island.

After treatment is completed, the water could be discharged from the south end of the island.

Dennis Robinson Victoria –

Judy on Sewage

Greater Victoria is lucky to lack a “heritage” sewage system; it has, rather, a full-tilt antique.

After much initial debate, and some plans to leap into the 21st century, a second debate has begun over whether we leapt far enough and are considering a sufficient range of options.

Here is Judy Brownoff’s response to some of that debate. She is articulate and had done a lot of homework.

I think regionally we have been getting citizens

up to speed on a number of “waste” responsibility issues. I see more and more people at groceries stores looking at labels on products in the household aisle. Look how successful we have been with plastic bags. I just think the Federal Government who “okays” these products need to be more diligent, they create the wastewater regulations, so they should be helping bring awareness to some of these products. I know federally there is a group studying these domestic products of concern and CRD has participated in and continues to study various contaminants.

Dockside Community was built on a “brownfield” from the ground up. They were able to double “plumb” with purple pipes, etc. They recycle wastewater for flushing toilets, water feature and some landscape watering, they DO NOT treat their sludge. Their screenings are trucked to Hartland to bury and the balance is sent to the septage facility in Langford where air is injected and the sludge rises to the top and is skimmed off and transported to Chemainus to a composting facility and ultimately placed on land. I believe these standalone type of facilities will still happen but where density, and from the ground up opportunities are projected under the RGS, which is the West Shore. These standalone facilities must not impact the regional system, pipes and pumps, ie temperature of effluent entering from a municipality is important, plus MoE is the approving authority and they require a “back up” system and like Dockside, the back up system is the regional system. When Dockside has a failure they open a gate and all the sewage flows into Victoria sewer lines into the regional system.

Unfortunately where the majority of the sewage is created in the core is in low density areas that are already built. The cost of re-plumbing “every home” to run new water pipes from the road to, and throughout the house to each toilet would not be minimal. To cut apart the walls of every apartment building, business and home within the Core Area to run new pipes would be costly.  The reuse of reclaimed water is a great goal but the regulations are very restrictive and we did a few reports on this and even took a specific area (UVIC and surrounding area) to study water reuse and energy in 2010. (I’m still hopeful for UVIC (even though they are currently working on biomass facility) for some of their energy needs.)

CRD system is modular, designed to add on components as we need, McLoughlin has UV and oxidation space planned in design, all systems have to be flexibility, and CRD has a decentralized approach to our wastewater system, a plant for the Peninsula, the Core Area facility will handle the waste from the seven municipalities probably until 2040 or until McLoughlin gets to about 90% full, then another facility will be created for the West Shore where density is predicted to happen under RGS, plus we have Saltspring Island. A centralized sludge digestion facility will allow us to take the sludge from “private” facility like Sooke and Dockside, as well as our own SaanPen facility and put into the digestion process to create more biogas as opposed to burying and taking up space at Hartland. Plus there are solid waste integration opportunities that can happen.

I personally believe that we create the waste locally, and we should manage it locally, not ship it to another area to manage. I’ve very excited about biogas production this came from a fact finding mission to Sweden. They use this gas in their bus system! And of course we can make it ready for using in “heating” as well. I forgot to mention that we are also creating struvite from the wastewater, that is a technology created by UBC students that removes the phosphorous from the wastewater and creates a “green” fertilizer for farming. Robert Kennedy bought the technology and the product is called Ostara and I see Saskatoon (I think that’s who it was) in Saskatchewan just announced the first facility in Canada …. I wanted CRD to be  … oh well! Hope this helps, and if I can give you any more information let me know.