Doors Recycled–Reused–Rescued

 

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downtoearthstyle.blogspot.com
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downtoearthstyle.blogspot.com
Door / window repurpose in the garden

Repurposed Doors In The Garden

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houzz.com

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houzz.com

justimagine-ddoc.com

Old Paned Window planters

Old Paned Window planters

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justimagine-ddoc.com

heatherbullard.typepad.com

old wrought iron garden gate

old wrought iron garden gate

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heatherbullard.typepad.com

realcutflowergarden.blogspot.com

decorated garden gate

decorated garden gate

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realcutflowergarden.blogspot.com
Old doors.

Old doors.

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images.search.yahoo.com

Image detail for -Primitive Country Decor Stands The Test Time Pictures

Image detail for -Primitive Country Decor Stands The Test Time Pictures

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images.search.yahoo.com

cdn.indulgy.com

old window chair

old window chair

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cdn.indulgy.com

bernideensteatimeblog.blogspot.com

weathered door

weathered door

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bernideensteatimeblog.blogspot.com
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diekleineprinzessin.tumblr.com

use old doors to decorate!

use old doors to decorate!

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diekleineprinzessin.tumblr.com

interiorstyledesign.tumblr.com

LOVE this Garden Gate~

LOVE this Garden Gate~

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interiorstyledesign.tumblr.com

apartmenttherapy.com

reuse a panel door

reuse a panel door

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apartmenttherapy.com

flickr.com

Great idea!         love!
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flickr.com

canadiangardening.com

good reuse of doors

good reuse of doors

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canadiangardening.com

forums2.gardenweb.com

Screen door trellis

Screen door trellis

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forums2.gardenweb.com

inspirationoooooahhhhh.tumblr.com

Old door turned into clock

Old door turned into clock

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inspirationoooooahhhhh.tumblr.com

huckleberrylanefurniture.blogspot.com

backyard swing <3

backyard swing ♥

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huckleberrylanefurniture.blogspot.com

houzz.com

Recycled garden backdrop    Cool garden installation made from recycled windows, a door frame and wrought iron.

Recycled garden backdrop Cool garden installation made from recycled windows, a door frame and wrought iron.

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houzz.com
Our summer yard art project.  Repurposed old door and window frame with a pallet path :)

Our summer yard art project. Repurposed old door and window frame with a pallet path 🙂

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woodlandslifestylesandhomes.com

A mirror, shutters and a gate painted black — gives the illusion of a door that leads to another side beyond the fence.

A mirror, shutters and a gate painted black — gives the illusion of a door that leads to another side beyond the fence.

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woodlandslifestylesandhomes.com
Potting bench with old sink and door ---> Love the shelves...but maybe a cupboard?

Potting bench with old sink and door —> Love the shelves…but maybe a cupboard?

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hometalk.com

Old doors are easily found on garbage day. This old door must have been from the 70's.  Perfectly shabby making it ideal for a garden (plant) bench

Old doors are easily found on garbage day. This old door must have been from the 70’s. Perfectly shabby making it ideal for a garden (plant) bench

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hometalk.com
A screen door project my husband made for my mom :)  Nice garden addition!!!

A screen door project my husband made for my mom 🙂 Nice garden addition!!!

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yearroundveggiegardener.blogspot.com

Niki Jabbour - The Year Round Veggie Gardener: I'm back.. with wonderful winter garden photos to share!

Niki Jabbour – The Year Round Veggie Gardener: I’m back.. with wonderful winter garden photos to share!

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yearroundveggiegardener.blogspot.com

teencraftconnection.com

DIY Vertical Kitchen garden & seed starting trays. Single repuposed bi-fold shuttered closet door and dollar store container trays. Materials used and the how Mom did it on Teen Craft Connection's page.

DIY Vertical Kitchen garden & seed starting trays. Single repuposed bi-fold shuttered closet door and dollar store container trays. Materials used and the how Mom did it on Teen Craft Connection’s page.

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teencraftconnection.com
Gorgeous & Colorful shed made of ten recycled doors, discovered in yes, you guessed it: Door County, WI

Gorgeous & Colorful shed made of ten recycled doors, discovered in yes, you guessed it: Door County, WI

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indulgy.com

repurposing old doors and windows | greenhouse made from old windows, love the tin siding (old tin ceiling ...

repurposing old doors and windows | greenhouse made from old windows, love the tin siding (old tin ceiling …

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indulgy.com

blog.bernideens.com

There's so many ways to use old doors in the garen. This one is very romantic looking.

There’s so many ways to use old doors in the garen. This one is very romantic looking.

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blog.bernideens.com

junkmarketstyle.com

Dressing up the Yard, My attempt at re-purposing an old bi-fold door

Dressing up the Yard, My attempt at re-purposing an old bi-fold door

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junkmarketstyle.com
Often we have problem on what to do with our defective doors, they would take a lot of our storage space! But if you are a crafty person, then you can upcycle them for a different purpose!

Often we have problem on what to do with our defective doors, they would take a lot of our storage space! But if you are a crafty person, then you can upcycle them for a different purpose!

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flickr.com

That door should be saved and not left to     rot.

That door should be saved and not left to rot.

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flickr.com
garden bench made from repurposed door...

garden bench made from repurposed door…

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fairenotions.blogspot.com

Repurposed Door garden shed.  But of course!  Why didn't I think of this?  Okay girls... looks like GG is a hunting at her ReStore.

Repurposed Door garden shed. But of course! Why didn’t I think of this? Okay girls… looks like GG is a hunting at her ReStore.

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fairenotions.blogspot.com

flickr.com

reusing glass doors from a for funky decor in garden - maybe one day when we have a bigger place

reusing glass doors from a for funky decor in garden – maybe one day when we have a bigger place

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flickr.com

repinly.at-my-style.com

garden decor: Re-purposed old French doors used for pseudo-wall/screen in the patio setting...love!  Idea to note: would start trailing vines to drape over

garden decor: Re-purposed old French doors used for pseudo-wall/screen in the patio setting…love! Idea to note: would start trailing vines to drape over

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repinly.at-my-style.com

myrepurposedlife.net

Door turned into a shelf; could easily be made into bench with storage underneath.  Picture the window panes with b/w photos in each.  Sweet!

Door turned into a shelf; could easily be made into bench with storage underneath. Picture the window panes with b/w photos in each. Sweet!

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myrepurposedlife.net

hometalk.com

Garden Salvage  I took an old door and coated the glass with mirror paint, then I mounted it on my fence. I added some porch poles and bunk bed slats as a frame around the door; decorating it with paint and flower pot finials. I added a decorative piece of steel as a topper and put some stepping stones in front of it. This is my

Garden Salvage I took an old door and coated the glass with mirror paint, then I mounted it on my fence. I added some porch poles and bunk bed slats as a frame around the door; decorating it with paint and flower pot finials. I added a decorative piece of steel as a topper and put some stepping stones in front of it. This is my “secret” door to nowhere.

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hometalk.com

landliebe-cottage-garden.blogspot.com.au

Re-purposed shutters as a garden screen. This is a great idea.  We used our front door's -  Old wrought iron doors for the back yard.....the ivy has started climbing.

Re-purposed shutters as a garden screen. This is a great idea. We used our front door’s – Old wrought iron doors for the back yard…..the ivy has started climbing.

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landliebe-cottage-garden.blogspot.com.au

dishfunctionaldesigns.blogspot.com

New Takes On Old Doors: Salvaged Doors Repurposed potting bench for gardeners DIY. I had one of these from the red barn in Modesto. had to sell it when we moved. I guess I will make my next one.

New Takes On Old Doors: Salvaged Doors Repurposed potting bench for gardeners DIY. I had one of these from the red barn in Modesto. had to sell it when we moved. I guess I will make my next one.

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dishfunctionaldesigns.blogspot.com
No instructions, but it looks pretty self-explanatory.

No instructions, but it looks pretty self-explanatory.

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Red, antique door used as a garden gate.  What a great idea!  garden ideas.  vintage doors.  repurposed doors.  gardening.  garden gate.

Red, antique door used as a garden gate. What a great idea! garden ideas. vintage doors. repurposed doors. gardening. garden gate.

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Farmers who have made a difference: Paul Willis

Paul WillisPaul Willis. Returning the family farm to an earlier model.

Willis-porkers

What Humanely-Raised Pork Looks and Tastes Like

October 19, 2011 by Amelia

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There’s a long-running joke that Iowa is the “fly-over” state in the U.S. – nothing but a wash of cornfields and pork-producing confinement buildings that looks like a rectangular checkerboard from planes overhead. I’ve even heard the joke come from the mouths of Iowans themselves.  But I saw and experienced something completely different on a recent trip to Des Moines, the heart of the pork-producing state.

I came up-close to a curious mother sow and her black-and-white speckled piglets; snacked on chorizo-green chile-stuffed tacos made with homemade corn tortillas; bought a hand-carved, hand-smoothed chunk of rusty-colored wood that now holds fruit on my dining table; tasted raw, juicy slices of 20 different kinds of heirloom tomatoes; trail-blazed through the tall, clover-spiked purple, yellow and green grasses of natural Midwestern prairie; savored every bite of 18-hour, slow-roasted whole pork immediately after “pulling” alongside pork belly, glistening with its hearty layer of fat cut-through by a meaty underside and crispy-caramel skin; and, most importantly, met some of thekindest farmers and ranchers who care deeply about their families, their animals, and the earth.

This was my trip to the pork “division” of Niman Ranch, and more specifically, to the birthplace and working farm of Paul Willis, founder of the Niman Ranch Pork Company who has been crowned by Alice Waters and other chefs, food-lovers and other as the “godfather of pork.”

Paul has weathered, tan skin and some wrinkling around the eyes – evidence of a life as a happy, constantly smiling and outdoor living farmer. Donned in his staple blue overalls, which he once refused to sell for a hefty price to an affluent visitor, Paul speaks softly but knowledgeable, being a living legend among chefs and culinarians. And, apparently Chipotle as well.

Niman Ranch is known as the answer for sustainable, humanely-raised meat that’s produced around the country, but distributed like local food. Niman’s business strategy differs from the big distribution companies that focus on grand-scale, cross-country trucking and commercial animal production, otherwise known as factory farms, as a way to meet those big demands. Instead, Niman’s program is the opposite: it’s a network of small farms that pool their resources and products as way to keep things small-scale and sustainable while meeting the needs of customers around the country. It’s a business philosophy that’s started the “slow food” concept of transforming this country’s food system completely – for the better.

When Bill Niman decided to get into the pork business, he first searched around his state of California for producers, but failed to find the right match. Through Alice Waters, he learned about Paul, who was one of the only pork producers in the country raising their pigs completely outdoors. Immediately, Niman loved Paul’s pork. “He told me to send him 30 more chops,” Paul said. “I had to figure out how was I going to get those to him? Do I put them on a plane? Or do I send the animals on a train and have them processed in California?” Paul ended up doing the latter and the rest was history.

During the eighties, Paul explained during the trip to his ranch, pork began being bred for a leaner product that could compete with the popularity of chicken breast. The pork board added further pressure in this regard, and many farmers found they didn’t have as much use for the fattier parts or lard byproduct as more consumers switched from lard to oil. The new breed of pork was a leaner one, and that meant the pigs couldn’t withstand the cold temperatures and harsh winters that of the Iowan, Midwestern climate without that important layer of fatback they once had. On top of that, pigs use that layer of fat like sweat glands since they don’t have any. This meant the hot, Midwestern summers were just as unbearable.

The solution for this was to move the pigs indoors. But Paul refused to do so. As a result, he became part of the less than 5 percent of pork producers that, to this day, still raise their animals completely in confinement operations. More often than not in these operations, pigs have little, if any, room to move around and very little care or attention, as many of the production companies have “outsourced” management of these facilities to poorly paid workers, including illegal workers, who literally come in to check temperatures and remove dead animals. This is also precisely why antibiotics became infused in feed and water as a way to prevent stress-induced illness before it happened.

Paul’s pigs are Berkshire, Duroc and Chester White, three of the types of pork that are known for their generous fat layer so they can remain outdoors, and juicy, tender meat. In fact, Paul’s breed standards are extraordinarily intense. Interested farmers must apply and ensure their raising and production processes are in line with the at least eight pages of standards outlined in the Niman Ranch application. They also have to go through a few rounds of farm visits, tasting and pH testing. During a demonstration of the difference between commodity and Niman pork chops, Niman’s field operations manager Lori Lyon explained that the company’s standards for pH is 5.7 or above. Most commodity pork, on the other hand, has a pH as low as 2 or 3, meaning these chops are highly acidic. And you can tell from looking at it, too. Ever seen a package of pork chops from the grocery store “swimming” in what looks like a pool of water? That’s actually the juices of the pork running out as it breaks down from its own acidity.

Lactic acid is the culprit, and that acid builds up if the animal is stressed just before slaughter. The most lactic-acid preventing and also humane slaughter method, used by Niman and increasing numbers of even commodity producers these days, is to group the animals together according to their age and “pack,” then gas the animals so they fall asleep. At that point they are killed and processed. This method has increasingly replaced the stunning method, during which workers can “miss” an animal and have to repeat the stunning, twice, even three times. Pigs are intelligent so when they see others of their kind in distress, it causes them to be distressed. The horror stories of the sounds and smells coming from those slaughter houses became too much for a lot of those workers, including one who spoke about his experiences during the Niman ranch trip.

On the farm, Paul’s pigs are happy. They run around, play, snort, root, sleep, eat and cuddle together. Contrary to the cartoons and sayings, pigs actually don’t enjoy sitting in their own you know what, though they do enjoy a cool mud patch from time to time. They also enjoy hanging with other pigs in general, but mostly those their age. Sows are kept separate with their black and white speckled piglets who curiously peer out from inside the small shed shelters scattered about the field. The “adolescents” look like a pack of deer running back and forth from a nearby predator, though they’re really just “exercising,” Paul said. Other curious potbellied creatures were braver to approach us and say hello. We smiled and said hello back.

Later that evening for dinner, our group gathered around an indoor-outdoor shed of sorts where the Willis family and friends had set up an enormous buffet of foods, from caprese salads with heirloom tomatoes, corn salsas, homemade bread and fresh churned butter, hot, crispy jalapeno poppers, and home-cured salamis paired with fresh cheeses and picked vegetables. But the star of the show was the whole hog, head, apple-stuffed mouth and all, that had been smoked for 18 hours in a massive smoker at the Niman specialty meats processing center nearby. The meat was a mixture of tender, pulled pork layered with fattier bits that barely needed the bread, let alone a sauce. And then the finale: huge pork belly chunks with all their layers perfectly intact: tender-braised meat on bottom, succulent fat in the middle, and a crisp, seared top. Just like the French make it. Just like a sustainable Iowa farmer makes it.

After dinner, a few of us got off an over-packed hay ride to walk with Paul through his prairie and wildlife preserve, a experimental project with the state of Iowa. As we walked through the tall, yellow and purple flower-spiked grasses, Paul ran his hands along the trunks of the stems, pointing out the different species and birds that flew in and out. Crickets purred softly. At one point, a hummingbird hummed by. Downhill, just beyond the little pond at the center of the field, the sun began to set and cast a purple hue across the sky. Though he doesn’t raise any pigs on this particular property, this is where Paul’s family lives, cooks, eats and gathers. He calls it “Dream Farm.” One can see why.

Local Motors & MOTO

Saw two entrepreneurs on TV this morning. Both pretty true to the real meanings of the word.

Both with m-o-t-o in their names.

One runs a large restaurant and is moving into “food design” and internal farms.

moto-homaro_16-baking MOTO-plate

Quick review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRSwwSg52Kw#t=111

He is also working on production of food right within his own restaurant. Here’s the farm video summary: http://motorestaurant.com/farm/ and some text: http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=163075

Here is Moto’s wine list:

CHAMPAGNE

bin#

  • 412 – larmandier-bernier, TERRE DE VERTUS BLANC DE BLANCS 1er CRU, vertus, brut nature 2007 ($195)
  • 401 – pierre peters, GRAND CRU BLANC DE BLANCS, oger, brut 2006 ($175)
  • 413 – billecart-salmon, BLANC DE BLANCS, mareuil-sur-ay, france, brut 1999 ($275)
  • 404 – camille saves, CARTE BLANCE GRAND CRU, bouzy, champagne, brut, nv ($125)
  • 399 – alain thienot, reims, champagne, france, brut, nv ($100)

SPARKLING

  • 402 – gruet, SAUVAGE BLANC DE BLANCS, albaquerque, new mexico, usa, nv ($45)
  • 414 – l.  mawby, CREMANT CLASSIC, vignoles, leelanau peninsula, michigan, usa, nv ($60)
  • 410 – domaine du petit coteau, vouvray, loire valley, nv ($40)
  • 411 – juve y camps, CINTA PURPURA RESERVA, cava, spain, brut, nv ($40)
  • 408 – andre et michel quenard, jacquere, savoie, france, nv ($60)
  • 400 – inman family, ENDLESS CRUSH ROSE, pinot noir, russian river valley, california, usa, brut 2009 ($105)
  • 420 – alma negra, MISTERIO ROSE, malbec, mendoza, argentina, nv ($40)
  • 403 – emanuele scammacca del murgo, ROSE, nerello mascalese, sicaly, italy, brut 2009 ($70)

CHARDONNAY

  • 164 – domaine costal, LES TRUFFIERES, chablis, france 2009 ($60)
  • 100 – edi simcic, brda, slovenia 2007 ($80)
  • 146 – hirsch vineyards, sonoma coast, california, usa 2011 ($140)
  • 106 – ramey, HYDE VINEYARD, carneros, california, usa 2009 ($120)

SAUVIGNON BLANC

  • 197 – andre dezat et fils, sancerre, loire valley, france 2010 ($60)
  • 113 – walter hansell, GADDY LANE VINEYARD, lake county, california, usa 2011 ($45)
  • 107 – ata rangi, martinborough, new zealand 2011 ($40)
  • 205 – stony brook, GHOST GUM, franschhoek valley, south africa 2010 ($55)
  • 209 – rudd, mt veeder, napa valley, california, usa, 2011 ($145)
  • 165 – domaine didier dagueneau, BLANC FUME DE POUILLY, loire valley, france 2008 ($200)
  • 147 – domaine didier dagueneau,  SILEX , pouilly-fume, loire valley, france 2008 ($230)
  • 135 – domaine didier dagueneau, SILEX, pouilly-fume, loire valley, france 2009 ($275)

RIESLING

  • 185 – kunstler, DRY, rheingau, germany 2012 ($45)
  • 198 – kunstler, OLD VINES, rheingau, germany 2008 ($105)
  • 148 – fritz haag, mosel, germany 2010 ($45)
  • 196 – balthasar ress, HATTENHEIMER NUSSBRUNNEN AUSLESE, rheingau, germany 2002 (375ml) ($85)
  • GRÜNER VELTLINER
  • 220 – rudi pichler, FEDERSPIEL, wachau, austria 2011 ($60)

PINOT GRIS/PINOT GRIGIO

  • 203 – bolzano, ST. MAGDALENA, alto adige, italy 2012 ($35)
  • 112 – domaine zind humbrecht, CLOS JEBSAL, alsace, france 1996 ($195)

ITALIAN WHITE VARIETIES

  • 206 – sergio mottura, POGGIO DELLA COSTA, grechetto di civitella d’agliano, italy 2011 ($45)
  • 182 – ottin, petite arvine, vallee d’aosta, italy 2010 ($60)
  • 213 – matthiasson, sauvignon blanc/ ribolla gialla/ semillon/ friulano, napa valley, california, usa 2011 ($75)

WHITE RHÔNE VARIETIES

  • 191 – broc, VINE STARR, grenache blanc/picpoul/counoise, centgral coast, california, usa 2011 ($50)
  • 163 – mas jullien, vin de pays de ‘lherault, languedoc, france 2007 ($95)
  • 204 – turner pageot, LE BLANC, languedoc, france 2010 ($40)

SPANISH WHITE

  • 103 – izadi, rioja, spain 2011 ($50)

HUNGARIAN DRY WHITE

  • 105 – royal tokaji wine company, tokaj, hugary 2011 ($45)
  • GREEK WHITE
  • 125 – alexakis, malvasia, crete greece 2011 ($30)

ROSÉ

  • 201 – domaine tempier, bandol, provence, france 2012 ($90)
  • 208 – hedges, cabernet franc, red mountain, washington, usa 2012 ($55)

PINOT NOIR AND GAMAY

  • 1008 – albert morot, CENT-VIGNES 1ER CRU, beaune, burgundy, france 2009 ($130)
  • 1343 – domaine lucien boillo, LES ANGLES 1ER CRU, volnay, burgundy, france 2009 ($170)
  • 1034 – waits-mast, OPPENLANDER VINEYARD, mendocino county, california, usa 2009 ($95)

ITALIAN REDS

  • 1093 – gaja, SORI SAN LORENZO, barbaresco, piedmont  1988 ($975)
  • 900  – santome, raboso, piave, veneto 2002 (3L) ($160)
  • 814 – villa calcinaia, VIGNA BASTIGNANO, chianti classico, italy 2009 ($230)
  • 817 – sestadisopra, rosso di montalcino, italy 2007 ($130)

RED BORDEAUX VARIETIES

  • 1091 – chateau haut-brion, graves, france 1982 ($2,000)
  • 818 – rudd estate, oakville, napa valley, california, usa 2006 ($240)
  • 1002 – ridge, MONTE BELLO, santa cruz mountains, california, usa 1994 ($540)
  • 822 –  ridge, MONTE BELLO, santa cruz mountains, california, usa 1995 ($340)
  • 1092 –  ridge, MONTE BELLO, santa cruz mountains, california, usa 2008 ($320)
  • 1095 –  ridge, MONTE BELLO, santa cruz mountains, california, usa 2008 (3L) ($1500)
  • 967 – lieb cellars, RIGHT COAST RED, north fork, long island, new york, usa 2008 ($60)

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

  • 821 – corison KRONOS VINEYAR, napa valley, california, usa 2006 ($210)
  • 802 – dunn, howell mountain, napa valley, california, usa 1989 ($360)
  • 804 – dunn, howell mountain, napa valley, california, usa 1997 ($430)
  • 969 – vine hill ranch, VHR, napa valley, california, usa 2009 ($365)

RED RHONE VARIETIES

  • 832 – domaine du joncier, CLASSIQUE, lirac, france 2010 ($55)
  • 824 – domaine du vieux telegraphe, LA CRAU, chateauneuf-du-pape, france 2010 ($175)
  • 1035 – hatton estate, syrah, gimblett gravels, hawkes bay, new zealand 2004 ($115)
  • 816 – cayuse vineyards, CAILLOUX VINEYARD, syrah, walla walla valley, washington, usa 2010 ($210)

SOUTH AMERICAN REDS

  • 1349 – arboleda, carmenere, colchagua valley, chile 2009 ($50)
  • 812 – sena, cabernet sauvignon/carmenere/merlot/petit verdot/cabernet franc, aconcagua valley, chile 2010 ($375)

SPANISH AND PORTUGESE REDS:

  • 972 – hacienda monasterio, tinta del pais, ribera del duero, spain 2009 ($130)
  • 1357 –  artadi, VINA EL PISON, rioja, spain 2010 ($630)

What a cool idea. Open systems for transportation vehicles. All the design tools are in open source and available to the public.

Prototypes are working.

LOCAL MOTORS

LOCALMOTORS.COM

Excerpt video:

How It Works

Retail

You can buy innovative vehicle products directly from the Microfactory’s retail space. This includes exclusive Local Motors brand items such as t-shirts and duffle bags, but we also sell exciting products from local and international companies that will enhance your automotive lifestyle. Visit the Shop online to view some of our current options.

Learn More

Co-Creation

Co-creation is an essential element of vehicle innovation at Local Motors. Microfactories bring the internal Local Motors team, the virtual community, and the physical community together to make this concept a reality. Utilizing the Local Motors website, designers, engineers, fabricators and enthusiasts can submit their ideas, receive helpful feedback, and develop their designs.

Learn More

Community

Community is a core value at Local Motors.  Engaging the community to facilitate innovation and empower the maker community drives everything we do. At the Microfactory, you can collaborate with our LM Labs team to work on projects, attend one of our monthly open houses, schedule a Microfactory tour, or sign up for a Rally Fighter “Drive Experience” with a licensed driver.

<!– Learn More –>

Build Program

The Build Program at our Microfactories is the most immersive experience you can have at Local Motors. Using in-house tools, parts, and our interactive online build manual, anyone who buys a Rally Fighter constructs their own vehicle in the Microfactory with help from the Local Motors team.

<!– Learn More –>

Small is Beautiful. Badges for the Committed.

Here’s an entrepreneur working to popularize the market garden vision. Joe Wirtheim wants to give some badges this month (July 2013).  All you have to do is go to Facebook and find the Victory Garden of Tomorrow.

https://www.facebook.com/victorygardenoftomorrow

Enlist in The Future: VGoT Badges
There’s great power in small places.
VGoT badges are easy to sew           
            I can’t help but to smile when I touch one of these new graphic badges. They are substantial to hold and are so expressive, like little vintage toys. And when I think about the story of badges, I think about wilderness pioneering or space exploration–they represent the spirit of adventure to me. Take a look at our 3 new embroidered felt graphic badges. Each one comes mounted to a letterpressed collector’s card: Now Available: $7+SH Made in the United States.
VGoT Break New Ground badge           
Each one of these first edition badges are special. “Break New Ground” has been a rallying cry for people interested in trying something new in their neighborhoods, cities and lives. “Farmer’s Market Community” represents the sea change in how folks can get fresh foods outside the supermarket, as well as how neighbors connect. And the flying beet “Victory Garden of Tomorrow” badge, for me, represents the exuberance of discovering new modes of life and community in America.
VGoT Farmer's Market Community badge           
            I want to give away a bunch of these badges in July. All you have to do is go to Facebook and give “The Victory Garden of Tomorrow” Page a “Like.” Then look for announcements over the coming weeks.
Thank you for your support! Please stay in touch
           
Poster Prints
VGoT Badges           
Graphic Badges
           
Limited Edition Screen-Prints
           
Postcard pack

Principles of the Transition Network

Principles

Principles matter

They matter because the people we deal with on a  day to day basis can hold us accountable to them. They matter because  they’re how we look at problems, devise responses and  interact with people. They matter because the field that we’re operating in can knock us  sideways, and it’s really useful to have something solid to grab hold  of.

These are the principles that Transition Network aspires to as  an organisation, and we hope to model them in such as way that other  transitioners adopt them as well.

Like everything else, they’re  not cast in stone, and if the wider field of transition feels that they  need to change, then we welcome that input. This page is open for comments for that very purpose.

On this page we’ve listed the transition principles, permaculture principles and the characteristics of resilient systems – all of these are part of how transition has come about.

2012-11-30-quinoa

Transition principles

1. Positive Visioning

We can only create what we can first vision

  • If we  can’t imagine a positive future we won’t be able to create it.
  • A  positive message helps people engage with the challenges of these times.
  • Change is happening – our choice is between a future we want and one  which happens to us.
  • Transition Initiatives are based on a dedication to the  creation of tangible, clearly expressed and practical visions of the  community in question beyond its present-day dependence on fossil  fuels.
  • Our primary focus is not campaigning against things, but  rather on positive, empowering possibilities and opportunities.
  • The  generation of new stories and myths are central to this visioning work.

 2. Help People Access Good Information and Trust Them to Make Good  Decisions

  • Transition Initiatives dedicate  themselves, through all aspects of their work, to raising awareness of  peak oil and climate change and related issues such as critiquing  economic growth. In doing so they recognise the responsibility to  present this information in ways which are playful, articulate,  accessible and engaging, and which enable people to feel enthused and  empowered rather than powerless.
  • Transition Initiatives focus on  telling people the closest version of the truth that we know in times  when the information available is deeply contradictory.
  • The  messages are non-directive, respecting each person’s ability to make a  response that is appropriate to their situation.

3. Inclusion  and Openness

  • Successful Transition Initiatives need  an unprecedented coming together of the broad diversity of society. They  dedicate themselves to ensuring that their decision making processes  and their working groups embody principles of openness and inclusion.
  • This  principle also refers to the principle of each initiative reaching the  community in its entirety, and endeavouring, from an early stage, to  engage their local business community, the diversity of community groups  and local authorities.
  • It makes explicit the principle that  there is, in the challenge of energy descent, no room for ‘them and us’  thinking.
  • In a successful transition project every skill is valuable  because there is so much happening.
  • We need good listeners,  gardeners, people who like to make and fix everything, good parties,  discussions, energy engineers, inspiring art and music, builders,  planners, project managers.
  • Bring your passion and make that their  contribution – if there isn’t a project working in the area you are  passionate about, create one!!

4. Enable Sharing and Networking

  • Transition Initiatives dedicate themselves to sharing their  successes, failures, insights and connections at the various scales  across the Transition network, so as to more widely build up a  collective body of experience.

5. Build Resilience

  • This  stresses the fundamental importance of building resilience, that is,  the capacity of our businesses, communities and settlements to deal as  well as possible with shock.
  • Transition initiatives commit to building  resilience across a wide range of areas (food, economics, energy etc)  and also on a range of scales (from the local to the national) as seems  appropriate – and to setting them within an overall context of the need  to do all we can to ensure general environmental resilience.
  • Most communities in the past had – a generation or two ago – the basic  skills needed for life such as growing and preserving food, making  clothes, and building with local materials.

6. Inner and Outer Transition

  • The  challenges we face are not just caused by a mistake in our technologies  but as a direct result of our world view and belief system.
  • The impact  of the information about the state of our planet can generate fear and  grief – which may underlie the state of denial that many people are  caught in.
  • Psychological models can help us understand what is  really happening and avoid unconscious processes sabotaging change, e.g.  addictions models, models for behavioural change.
  • This  principle also honours the fact that Transition thrives because it  enables and supports people to do what they are passionate about, what  they feel called to do. 

7. Transition makes sense – the solution is the same size as the  problem

  • Many films or books who suggest that  changing light bulbs, recycling and driving smaller cars may be enough.  This causes a state called “Cognitive Dissonance” –a trance where you  have been given an answer, but know that it is not going to solve the  problem you’ve just been given.
  • We look at the whole system not  just one issue because we are facing a systems failure not a single  problem failure.
  • We work with complexity, mimicking nature in  solutions based problem solving.

8. Subsidiarity:  self-organisation and decision making at the appropriate level

  • This final principle enshrines the idea that the intention of  the Transition model is not to centralise or control decision making,  but rather to work with everyone so that it is practiced at the most  appropriate, practical and empowering level, and in such a way that it  models the ability of natural systems to self organise.
  • We create ways of working that are easy to copy and spread quickly

Permaculture principles

Permaculture principles provide some critical insights that inform how Transition has, and is, developing. Here’s the list from “Principles  And Pathways Beyond Sustainability” by David Holmgren

We’ve added some suggestions for how this might apply to the early stages of transition projects.

Principle Catch  Phrase An Example (from us)
Observe and interact Beauty is  in the eye of   the beholder Find out what is  already   happening locally before starting any project
Catch and store energy Make hay  while the sun   shines Use the energy that is    inspired by transition model – create lots of ways for people ways to  join   and give support
Obtain a yield You can’t  work on an   empty stomach Harvest ideas at  events   with post-its or flip charts
Apply self regulation and    accept feedback The sins of the fathers   are  visited on the children unto the seventh generation Create  spaces where your   community can let you know what they think; include  evaluation and evolution   in your plans
Use and value renewable    resources and services Let nature take its   course Work with  existing   currents, trends and projects where possible.
Produce no waste A stitch in  time saves   nine.. Waste not, want not Use psychological    awareness to avoid conflict where possible
Design from patterns to    details Can’t see the wood for   the  trees Energy descent planning –    strategic as well as micro
Integrate rather than    segregate Many hands make light   work Partnership  partnership   partnership!
Use small and slow solutions The bigger  they are the   harder they fall. Slow and steady wins the race Allow  groups time to form   and grow before expecting action
Use and  value diversity Don’t put all your eggs   in  one basket “Both.. and” rather than    “either/or” – let’s do it your way and   my way
Use edges  and value the   marginal Don’t think  you are on   the right track just because it is a well beaten path The  boundaries between   systems are interesting places – between existing  and new movements, council   and business, young and old.
Creative  use and respond   to change Vision is  not seeing   things as they are but as they will be Keep the  vision open,   active and creative – don’t tie it down or stop it  evolving.

 Characteristics of Resilient Systems

These are some very valuable pointers from “Resilience Thinking” by David Salter and Brian Walker.

   Characteristic    Description
Tight feedback The system knows   what’s happening inside itself quickly and can respond
Diversity Diversity in all   areas, ecological, social, economic needs to be attended to and supported.
Modularity Sub systems   within the system are independent or not over connected – if one fails they   don’t all fail.
Ecological   variability Eco systems   constantly change. Any attempts to limit or prevent change are generally   disastrous. Understanding the variability of a system is wise.
Understanding   slow variables Slow variables   are often the key to understanding systems. They determine the thresholds in   a system that can lead the system to tip into a new regime.
Social capital A resilient   world would promote trust, well developed social networks, and adaptability.   Resilience is very closely determined by the ability of people to respond and   work together.
Innovation A resilient   system places an emphasis on learning, experimentation, locally developed   rules, and embracing change.
Overlap in   governance Institutions   that include redundancy in their governing structure, and overlap in common   and private ownership with overlapping access rights
Ecosystem   services are valued We have to learn   to value ecosystem ‘services’. The earth is not an unlimited source of   materials and rubbish dump.
Human beings   have diverse connections to each other and all beings. These connections are   seen and unseen; inner and outer. All connection   to our world, ‘hidden’ energetic or inner, are accepted as implicit,   immanent, and integral to all of our understanding and practice. We must   explore and create awareness of our connections both to other people and to   all of creation.

 

Puglia in the spring

Puglia in the spring

The Individual Garden

In a rainforest, even a temperate rainforest, everything can grow like stink. The larger the farm/garden, the more work nature creates for you

You need tactics: weeding is impossible. Poisons should be verboten. Machinery is expensive–in many ways.

tarragon

One. BURY IT.

  • If you have a good source of compost, many kinds of weeds can simply be covered with a good layer of compost and you can plant right into that.
  • If you have old hay, you can put that down first; then some compost; then your seeds or sets. Or leave it all winter, to start rotting and integrating, and then add a layer of compost in May at planting time.
  • Ground covers. Italian oregano is great for those areas which you want to be green all year. but are not reseeding. We use a few others for temporary cover for a year or for crops like rhubarb where you don’t want to weed in the winter. Let the cover grow and then just pull it back in March to let the rhubarb flourish. I call those fragile covers. Compost does not have to be perfect to work. Doing this three or four years in a row helps build up both the height of your beds and the richness of your worm layer.

Two. PEACE ACCORDS.

  • We are experimenting this year with setting some grassed areas aside for regeneration.  If you have a large lawn, a crop of hay in a portion of your lawn looks good and helps offset the carbon emissions you make while mowing the formal portions.
  • In one area, we’re using the invasive properties of mint and tarragon and marjoram to wage a running battle against other competitors. Once or twice a year, we give it a little edge with the weed-wacker to take off the top layer where the grasses are putting their heads up.

Three. DENSITY.

  • Seeds are cheaper than weeding.
  • There are no bylaws for gardens.
  • If there’s a bare patch, get something growing as quickly as possible.
  • Don’t worry about compatibility; nature doesn’t. If your bed has 15 different kinds of flowers and vegetables in it, they probably all love all the companions.

Vegetables will flourish whether  your beds are level, raised or even sunken.

Dedicated pathways  where you walk are the key because compacted soil is the enemy of strong plant growth. The more easily a plant  can send roots into the soil, the faster the plant can absorb the nutrients it  needs and the more drought-resistant it becomes. If the plant has to spend  energy pushing roots into hardened soil, the plant has less energy to grow and  produce well. In nature, meadow mice, moles, earthworms and other critters tunnel  throughout the soil — and thus counteract compaction — and humans and other  large critters do not walk over the soil often. But in a garden, we walk back  and forth a great deal, and our footsteps definitely compact the soil.

Don’t over plan or the rain will do you in. Paths can be narrow or wide, straight or winding. Always  make a few main paths wide enough to accommodate a garden cart or wheelbarrow  comfortably. You can use wooden stakes, pipes or rebar to mark the corners  of the beds. The stakes can do double duty as hose guides — simply slip a length  of plastic pipe loosely over each, and hoses will slide around them easily.

Growing vegetables in garden beds is far more efficient than maintaining  single rows of crops. From the paths on either side of a bed, you can easily  weed and harvest crops in a bed 3 to 4 feet wide. A good guide is at http://www.realfarmacy.com/how-to-make-cheap-garden-beds1/#lSZMG27jbK0gW5iQ.99

drain pipe planter

drainpipeplanter

 

You will need:

An electric drill with a hole cutting bit that will cut a 5 – 7cm hole
A 2 or 3mm drillbit for the watering pipe
A length of PVC downpipe 100mm or 150mm diameter. (The length will = the height of the unit)
End cap for the downpipe
A narrower diameter (15mm or thereabouts) length of downpipe for watering. Make it about 8 – 10cm longer than the downpipe. If you have a pressurised irrigation system, you can use a length of soak hose instead
A cork
A knife
Duct tape
A length of geotextile (or hessian would do) for wrapping the watering pipe
Twine for tying the fabric to the watering tube
Good fertile soil (test it if you can – strawbs prefer it slightly acidic)
1 litre or so of coarse gravel
Strawberry plants (I used a mixture of different varieties)
A few companion plants (nasturtiums or marigolds)
Large tub or box (to stand unit in whilst filling)
Fixing collar or ties

Step 1: Cutting

Decide on length of unit and cut the tower tube and watering tube accordingly. Don’t forget to make the watering tube 8-10cm longer! I made mine the height of the outside staircase outside as it gets pretty good sun there and the rails give me something to secure the unit to.

Step 2: Drilling the watering tube

Drill vent holes in watering tube. Only drill these in the top 2/3 of the tube as the water will run down to the bottom plants. If you put holes all the way down the upper planter won’t get quite enough water as it will all rush out the lower holes. If you think you will do a good job of capping off the base end of the tube, you can put one small hole at the bottom so it doesn’t go anaerobic in there.

Step 3: Completing the watering tube

Cut the geotextile or hessian to the shape that will cover the holes in the watering pipe. You don’t want roots getting in there and clogging it up.

Then carefully with a knife, whittle down the cork til it fits the end of the watering tube. Now seal it off with duct tape (You don’t want this coming apart whilst you assemble/plant the unit!)

Step 4: Cutting the holes in the tower

Cut the holes in the tower tube. Remember that one side will face the wall so only put holes on the surfaces that will get sunlight. I made 3 rows of holes and staggered them with holes about 20cm depth apart vertically. Leave the last 20cm intact with no holes. Some of this will be a reservoir of the lower level plants.

Step 5: Filling

Place the large container against the wall – a corner is best so the tube is less likely to fall over. Place end cap over the base of the tube (I didn’t seal mine so I can dissemble the unit and make modifications if necessary.) Insert watering tube then fill the bottom 10 cm with coarse gravel.

Step 6: Planting: For the lowest hole I recommend planting a companion, less incentive for pests to climb up. If you are using stoloniferous varieties (those strawberries that spread with runners along the surface) you can leave a few gaps in the lower holes. As the runners cascade down you can poke them into these vacant spaces. Saves a few bucks, huh? When filling, I found it easiest to pour the soil from the top and poke the plants in the holes. Make every 6th one a companion.

Step 7: Location:

Once it’s planted find make sure when moving it that you hold it with one hand under the endcap if it’s not fixed. (Nothing like watching your plantings all shoot out the end to remind you of this necessity.) Secure it with your chosen fixings.

Watering: You will need to do this daily in warmer weather. Vertical units do require vigilant watering. The last thing you want is for it to dry out!

Handy tip. If you are noticing ants farming aphids on your strawberries, locate their path then smear some orange/citrus oil around the unit at this point. Stops them in their tacks!
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sources:

http://urbangreenspace.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/how-to-make-a-vertical-strawberry-tube-planter/ & Homestead Survival